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Developing Print Awareness Through Writing

We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Shared writing, guided writing and interactive writing all play an important part of an effective literacy program!


There are many recipes in developing print awareness, but they all pretty much contain the same

ingredients. We can help students to develop print awareness through reading, but we can also

work on it during writing. Just as reading activities are crucial components of an effective literacy

program, writing plays an important part as well.

Shared Writing

Shared writing is similar to shared reading in that the teacher and students work together to create

a message or a story. During this time, the teacher is in charge of the writing and establishes how

writing works. The teacher also helps students to understand and see that print is an idea or thought

written down. Shared writing also provides a ton of opportunities for teachable moments. Teachers

can review letters, sound-symbol correspondence, and phonological awareness as well as concepts 

of print.

Interactive Writing

Interactive writing once again allows the teacher and students to work together. However, this time

the teacher is not the only one with the pen. Students are able to participate by writing letters or

words, and then the teacher completes the rest. This is a fun time for students because they really

feel as if they had a part in the activity. They absolutely love to share the pen!


We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Don't forget this critical component of an effective literacy program!


Guided Writing

In previous years guided writing began more in first grade, although now it seems to have made its

way to kindergarten. Guided writing is normally what I do during our writing workshop time. It

consists of a mini-lesson, where the teacher takes the time to model and re-model everything. This

is when workshop procedures are reviewed, as well as the writing process and writing mechanics

among other things. In guided writing, the children are writing and you are walking around

responding to that writing. They could also be coming to you for writing conferences. Then

students have independent writing time, which we'll talk about next, and at the end of the writing

period, we have share time.

We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Don't forget this critical component of an effective literacy program!


Independent Writing

It is necessary that students write on a daily basis. They need the time to explore writing and

concepts of print. If their writing time is sporadic, you will not see the necessary growth in their

writing. During independent writing, students are writing without input from the teacher. They are

however able to get help from their peers.

We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Don't forget this critical component of an effective literacy program!



I think that writing is more difficult to teach than reading. There are a few things that I have

learned and I think that it makes all of the difference. Begin teaching writing as early as you can,

and as often as you can, preferably every day. It's as simple as that. The more your students

participate in writing, the better off they'll be. It makes a world of difference in their development

of print awareness.



We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Shared writing, guided writing and interactive writing all play an important part of an effective literacy program!

Concepts of Print

Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This set of free lesson plans will help you to know exactly where to begin!

Print awareness is an important component of a child's journey on the literacy train. We know that

the stronger their print awareness skills are, the higher their chance of success in reading. When 

students enter our classroom, we must be intentional in developing this print awareness. We can

definitely do this through reading, but what about those first days of school, when you are unsure

as to where you need to begin?


Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!


Before we ever pick up a book for comprehension purposes, we focus on print awareness. I like

 to begin the school year with 10 days of lessons that specifically focus on print awareness. The

first five days focus on concepts of books and the last five days focus on concepts of print. I also

like to take this time to talk about how a story made us feel. This can help to shape students' 

attitudes towards reading and writing in a positive way.


Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!

During this time we look at tons of posters, and we make some into anchor charts! It's a fun

way to introduce these to your students, because it is something that they will refer back to time

and time again. 

Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!

The awesome thing about this set of activities is that they do not require a certain book! These

lessons are applicable to any book that you choose to begin your school year. It is the perfect

way to introduce books to children, especially if they have not had exposure to them before.

Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!

It's amazing how much they learn in ten days and it makes learning enjoyable, which will

create positive literacy experiences for your students.

Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!

Print awareness is a crucial part of a child's growth in literacy and it's important that we




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Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!


Developing Print Awareness Through Reading

Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

There are many predictors of reading success for the littlest of learners. Print awareness is definitely

on that list. What students are taught is important, but perhaps even more crucial is how they are

taught. As educators, it is our job to ensure that they learn most effectively. To develop print

awareness, a program should contain a combination of teacher read-alouds, shared reading, guided

reading as well as some language activities.

Teacher Read-Alouds

Read-alouds are not only great for enjoyment, but they provide a ton of additional experiences for

our students. They are helpful for modeling concepts of print and vocabulary introduction. During 

this time students also begin to develop their story sense. For students to get the most out 

of a read-aloud, it is important that scaffolding is provided. Scaffolding is the support that we give 

to our students as they are being read to. It involves all of the good routines that we go through as 

we conduct a read-aloud: activating prior knowledge, making predictions and monitoring 

comprehension throughout the story, and having conversations and sharing thoughts after reading.

Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

Shared Reading

Shared reading goes a little bit deeper than a general read-aloud. Not only do students learn more

about print awareness, but you're also able to have a book talk of sorts with them. These mini-

lessons normally consist of three parts, before reading, during reading and after reading.

The book can be introduced, and the teacher can set a purpose for reading. It is important in the

initial stages to focus on one specific area per lesson, such as concepts about books, types of text

(fiction, non-fiction), concepts about print and how stories are made (setting, plot), etc. Shared

reading is usually conducted using a Big Book or some sort of chart that contains a story, poem or

song, etc.

Language Activities

Language activities can be found throughout the day. These activities are all collaborative and

independent activities such as word-work activities, songs, games, and poems that would support

and aid in letter and sound recognition, concepts of print and vocabulary development.

Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

This would be all of the activities that you create for morning tubs, early finisher activities

as well as all of the center activities. It is important to be thoughtful about what you are planning

for students to do, because it can aid or hinder their progress.


Independent Reading

It is essential that students be given time to dive into print materials independently, or with a

partner. This can be different books, charts, poems, or familiar text to be revisited. Over the years

it has looked different, has had many different names, but the objective remains the same.

Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

Whether your school uses Just-Right books, fluency folders, book buddies, SSR (self-sustained 

reading), or drop everything and read (DEAR), children need time to read without teacher input. 

It is during this time that they are able to practice everything they've learned during instruction.


There are many components of an effective literacy program, and this post covers just a few. It is

imperative that we continue to build print awareness through reading. It is necessary that we know

our students and how to configure the environment of the classroom and the accompanying

activities. If one were to take a bird's eye view of a classroom, there would be many moving

parts. It can take a while to get all of the pieces moving together but remember consistency

is vital!


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Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

Publishing Student Writing in the Primary Classroom

Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!

This post is sponsored by Studentreasures.

Your class has FINALLY reached the end of your writing unit, and now it's time for final drafts to be

completed and published! It's so important for young writers to be able to share their work with

someone other than their teacher or their peers. Publishing the writing of your students is the

perfect place to start!

Why Publish Student Writing?

There's nothing more inspiring for a young writer than to see their writing at its best. When students

begin writing, they are usually unable to read what they wrote yesterday. As they learn and grow in

their writing ability, they're so eager to go through the writing process and be able to get to that final

draft so that they can finally publish their work! It is important that we share and celebrate their

journey as a writer!

How Do I Publish Student Writing?

A fun way to publish their writing is through Studentreasures! A few years ago my class

published a book and they were so excited! Studentreasures made the process as easy as possible!

When your students find that they will be creating a classbook, their excitement for writer's

workshop will go through the roof!

Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!


Today I'm partnering with Studentreasures to help every child become a published author! They

provide free hands-on writing kits with a layout of your choice. As your students write their final

drafts, they are turned into a beautifully bound, hardcover book. Once their book is published,

having a publishing party and inviting parents is a special way to celebrate their writing!

What's the Catch?

So I know what you're thinking......what's the catch, how much does this cost? There is no catch at

all! For all of your hard work, your class will receive a book free of charge, all you have to do is

open up the ordering to parents. If they choose to purchase a book for themselves, they will

pre-order the book. This will be an awesome addition to your classroom library! If for any reason

they are not satisfied when they receive the book, Studentreasures has a 100% satisfaction

guaranteed policy! How awesome is that?

Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!


How Do I Sign Up?

Signing up is easy and painless, I promise! All you have to do is click here, and you can sign up 

to get your free publishing kit and writing activities to inspire your students!  Studentreasures

provides support along the way, so please know that you will not be alone as you walk with your

students through this process. You will also have access to their online Teacher Community!

Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!


Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Let

Studentreasures be a part of your publishing process today!


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Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!

Predictors of Reading Success

Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.

Research has shown time and time again that students must have exposure to repeated positive

literacy experiences in order to be successful. There are many things that factor into the reading

success of little ones, such as print awareness. They all come to school with their unique 

backgrounds and it is up to us to fill in their deficits. So let's dive into some early predictors of 

reading success. 

Knowledge of Letter Names

Letter Recognition is one of the biggest goals of kindergarten. It is also one of the predictors

of reading success in a student's first year of school. When students enter school and they do 

not have a frame of reference when it comes to letters, some of them can have a steep learning

curve ahead. In this case, accuracy is not always king. A student can be accurate in naming the

letters, but it is the ease with which they name the letters that we should be looking at. 

Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.

When a student can name the letters of the alphabet with fluency, then they will have an easier

time learning all about the sounds that letters make because they already have a frame of

reference. If a student spends most of their time figuring out what each letter is, they will have

less time and effort available to use other strategies to decode print.

Phonological Awareness

We know that most children begin to develop their sense of phonological awareness as  

preschoolers, but what is it exactly? It is the ability to think about the sounds in a word, an

understanding that words are made up of syllables, sounds, and rhymes. They begin to recognize

that words are their own thing (asking what the word bright means), that words can sound the

same (pet and wet), and they also become aware of individual sounds and can manipulate them.

Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.


When a student is well-developed in phonological awareness, then they already have a head

start in knowing how sounds and letters work together in print. When they have this ability, then 

they are able to begin using sound-letter knowledge effectively in reading and writing. One of the

strongest predictors of reading success in first grade and beyond is a student's level of 

phonological awareness at the end of kindergarten. If you have students who are struggling in 

this area, then early intervention is key.

Oral Language

Oral language is the foundation of learning literacy and a predictor of reading success. School

provides a language-rich environment, one that is different from the language used at home. It

will range anywhere from informal (used at home) to the more formal communication (used at

school). The development of this oral language is an important part of any successful

kindergarten program. So what is oral language? Initially, you would think that it is just the

spoken word, but it is also listening and thinking, which is all combined together to give you

oral language. The more a student explores language in the classroom, they begin to better

understand how to use language for reading and writing.

Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.

Another purpose of oral language in the classroom is to learn new information. By the time

they have arrived at school, they have already learned to talk. Once they enter our classrooms,

they have to talk to learn, in order to be successful. They begin to use what they already know

about language to help them make sense of what is written on a page. At this point, they start

to make a connection between oral and written language, which is crucial for emergent readers.


If you find that you have some students who are struggling with learning to read, take a quick

minute to see if they could have a deficit in one of these areas. If they do, then research has shown

that these students need explicit instruction in these areas through early intervention. Don't delay!


Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.