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What Is Phonemic Awareness?

Phonemic awareness is all about the spoken sound, and it is the foundation for reading!

What is phonemic awareness and how does it transform reading? It is the most important

ingredient in the reading recipe, but it seems to be forgotten at times. Phonemic awareness

falls under the umbrella of phonological awareness, which is an awareness of every level in

the sound structures of our language.

What is Phonemic Awareness?

Phonemic awareness is all about the spoken sound, or the phoneme, which is the smallest unit

of the language. It is an understanding of the structure of the language. This includes knowing

that the language is made up of words and in turn, words are made up of parts that we call

syllables in addition to rhymes and other sounds.  Before a student is able to understand written

language, they must have an understanding of the spoken language.

Phonemic awareness is all about the spoken sound, and it is the foundation for reading!

The simplest explanation is this......phonemic awareness gets the ears ready for what the eyes

are about to see. This is so true because if the ears are not ready, it does not matter what you 

put before a student. It will be a foreign concept to them.

Why is Phonemic Awareness Important?

Phonemic awareness is important because although children can know their letters and sounds, if

they are unable to understand and manipulate sounds, then they won't be able to do anything with

them. They will be unable to hear the parts of a word, nor will they be able to blend a word together.

Research has shown that the best predictors of student's reading success lie with their ability to

grasp phonemic awareness. When students arrive at school and their phonological awareness is

well-developed, then the probability of their success in making sense of how letters and sounds work

in print is high. It is necessary for students to be able to effectively use letter-sound correspondence

when it comes to reading and writing.

Phonemic awareness is all about the spoken sound, and it is the foundation for reading!

Phonemic Awareness in Whole Group

There are many moments where we can add phonemic awareness throughout our day. You can

definitely bring in phonemic awareness elements into your whole group time. I like to do

this during our read-aloud time. This is not a time to be very specific, as the children in your

classroom will likely have diverse needs. I use this time to introduce new concepts, and kind of see

where my students are in general. It's also good practice to incorporate phonemic awareness

activities into your daily reading time.

Phonemic awareness is all about the spoken sound, and it is the foundation for reading!

It is necessary to provide opportunities for children to develop their ear for language. Find all of

the stories that contain rhyming words and alliterations! As adults, we can be over these types of

books quickly, but they are a goldmine for students who are learning to listen inside of a word!

Include poems and silly songs as well. The good thing about poems and songs is that you can

put them on charts. Now yes, adding a visual brings in phonics, but for your students who are ready,

the visual aid is a good thing.

Phonemic Awareness in Small Group

Small group is where the magic happens! This is where you get the biggest bang for your buck. I

begin each small group with about 5 minutes of phonemic awareness. Now for my students who

have none, we spend more time on it. At the beginning of the year, we focus on it a lot, because

knowing where my students are helps me to know who is ready to begin phonics. The easiest place

to begin is simple and quick phonemic awareness routines. It gives me a fast snapshot of where each

student is.

Phonemic awareness quick routines!

It's so important that you don't go too fast. I know that pacing guides and the powers that be

seem to always rush students, but building up phonemic awareness in a student is just like

building a house. If the foundation isn't right, eventually the house will begin to crumble

and it will be an unstable structure. 

Phonemic awareness is all about the spoken sound, and it is the foundation for reading!


To switch it up a bit, I begin to add in picture supports. I find that it helps students who 

struggle, because although they may not get all of the answers right, it gives them a bit of a

confidence boost that they can identify the pictures correctly.

Phonemic awareness is all about the spoken sound, and it is the foundation for reading!    

Once again, if you find that initially, you are spending most of your small group on phonemic 

awareness, it is ok! They will make progress, and you will naturally see a path forward to begin

your phonics instruction.

Phonemic awareness is all about the spoken sound, and it is the foundation for reading!

At this point, the picture supports begin to include the letters that we are working on. It is 

during this time that they truly begin to understand how the letters and sounds work are

connected. At this point, you will begin more of a traditional small group, and you will find

that your groups become more and more differentiated.

Phonological awareness in small group.

Phonemic awareness is the foundation of reading. If you have students who are struggling, go 

back and check their level of phonemic awareness. I guarantee that it is an area that they are 

weak in, and therefore it is affecting their reading ability! By building up their ear to "hear", 

their reading will greatly improve!



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Phonemic awareness is all about the spoken sound, and it is the foundation for reading!

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Back to School Read Alouds



One of my favorite times of the school year is back to school time. I love being able to make a book

come alive for a little one! That means voices, theatrics, and everything! I usually begin the year with

reading for enjoyment, and introducing concepts of print. Then I dive a little deeper into a book, and 

I begin to lay those foundational skills for comprehension. This takes a lot of continuous modeling,

but it's so worth it!

This post contains affiliate links, which means that I'll get a few cents thrown my way at no 

cost to you. That'll help me keep this old blog running!

Kevin Knows the Rules

Created engaged learners with these back to school read alouds! They are perfect for introducing characters, setting and more!

Kevin Knows the Rules is a book that was unknown to me before last year. My sweet friend Keri

introduced this book to me, and I couldn't believe that I hadn't heard of it before. Any book about

rules and procedures in a classroom and I'm sold! I love how it shows Kevin actually obeying the

rules, so it is a model for the students to look at. This is a great place to discuss how we as the 

readers actually know that Kevin is following the rules!

The Little School Bus 

Created engaged learners with these back to school read alouds! They are perfect for introducing characters, setting and more!

Some of you might recognize this gem of a book if you were fortunate enough to come across a

certain reading program. It is absolutely hilarious and I will never part with it! It has a fun story,

and repeating text. I love looking at the pictures because they tell another story! Your students can 

practice rhymes and learn about characters and setting as well as sequence story events with The 

Little School Bus

The Recess Queen 

Created engaged learners with these back to school read alouds! They are perfect for introducing characters, setting and more!

Mean Jean and Katie Sue are the best literary pair this century. The Recess Queen is the perfect

book for discussing appropriate behaviors on the playground, as well as how we should and 

should not treat every person that we come across. With this book we focus on characters and 

setting of the story, as well as specific character traits for Mean Jean and Katie Sue.

What I Like About Me

Created engaged learners with these back to school read alouds! They are perfect for introducing characters, setting and more!

The children that are featured in What I Like About Me are as different as can be, and they are proud

to show off what makes them unique. The focus for this book is to introduce characters and settings,

and provides an opportunity for students to focus on what makes us all unique. In addition to writing

pages, students can also create a craft.


Each resource contains headers that can be used to create anchor charts and each book companion

contains a craft as well. You can find the book companions here, and you can grab the books from




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Created engaged learners with these back to school read alouds! They are perfect for introducing characters, setting and more!


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What is Phonological Awareness?

Students who are phonologically aware are at a great launching point to become great readers! So what's the difference between this, phonemic awareness and phonics?

There are so many terms that are used in education, it can definitely be overwhelming! A lot of times

they are used interchangeably (incorrectly so), and that adds to the confusion. We hear the words

phonics, phonemic awareness and phonological awareness thrown out there, but what do they

mean? Let's dive in!

What is Phonological Awareness?

Phonological awareness is like an umbrella term that covers the others. It is all about the sounds of

the spoken language. We must be sure that we don't confuse that with the word auditory. When we

talk about the word auditory, that means all of the sounds that are heard. Phonological means only

the sounds of the spoken language.

Students who are phonologically aware are at a great launching point to become great readers! So what's the difference between this, phonemic awareness and phonics?

When students have phonological awareness, that means that not only can they recognize different

sounds of spoken words, but they can also manipulate the sound parts of spoken words. This

includes phonemes (the individual sounds in a language), rhyming parts, alliteration, initial, medial,

final sounds as well as syllables, etc.

What is Phonemic Awareness?

Phonemic awareness is a type of phonological awareness. Phonemes are the smallest unit of sound

in spoken words. They are the smallest parts of oral words. When a child shows phonemic 

awareness, they are able to not only recognize but manipulate all of the individual phonemes in a 

word. It is important to remember that this has nothing to do with letters, not directly at least. 

Phonemic awareness is something that you can do with your eyes closed. 

Students who are phonologically aware are at a great launching point to become great readers! So what's the difference between this, phonemic awareness and phonics?


Students must have a very strong understanding of the spoken language before they will ever

understand the written language. Before they can identify the letter that makes a sound, they have

to first hear the sound. It is only when they hear the sound, that they'll be able to reproduce the

sounds that they hear, know the positions of the sounds, and then manipulate the sounds.

What is Phonics?

Phonics is all about the printed language. This is when letters are introduced, and the sounds that

are represented by those letters are discussed. It is during this time that students are introduced

to the alphabetic principle. They learn that the letters stand for sounds, and they begin to recognize

letters in all of the different forms (capital, lowercase, different fonts, etc.). They also begin to

visually discriminate between letters that look similar.

Phonological Awareness


Phonics is a skill that is done with your eyes open because it deals with visual input. Phonics

instruction helps students to be able to decode (read) words. This is important for encoding

(spelling) later on.


Research has shown that a child's level of phonological awareness when they reach the end of

kindergarten is a strong predictor of their future success in reading. When they are phonologically

aware, they are positioned to become great readers. When there is a focus on phonological

awareness, we can directly prevent reading problems. If a student comes to us with a phonological

deficit, then we can definitely address it!



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Students who are phonologically aware are at a great launching point to become great readers! So what's the difference between this, phonemic awareness and phonics?

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Developing Print Awareness Through Writing

We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Shared writing, guided writing and interactive writing all play an important part of an effective literacy program!


There are many recipes in developing print awareness, but they all pretty much contain the same

ingredients. We can help students to develop print awareness through reading, but we can also

work on it during writing. Just as reading activities are crucial components of an effective literacy

program, writing plays an important part as well.

Shared Writing

Shared writing is similar to shared reading in that the teacher and students work together to create

a message or a story. During this time, the teacher is in charge of the writing and establishes how

writing works. The teacher also helps students to understand and see that print is an idea or thought

written down. Shared writing also provides a ton of opportunities for teachable moments. Teachers

can review letters, sound-symbol correspondence, and phonological awareness as well as concepts 

of print.

Interactive Writing

Interactive writing once again allows the teacher and students to work together. However, this time

the teacher is not the only one with the pen. Students are able to participate by writing letters or

words, and then the teacher completes the rest. This is a fun time for students because they really

feel as if they had a part in the activity. They absolutely love to share the pen!


We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Don't forget this critical component of an effective literacy program!


Guided Writing

In previous years guided writing began more in first grade, although now it seems to have made its

way to kindergarten. Guided writing is normally what I do during our writing workshop time. It

consists of a mini-lesson, where the teacher takes the time to model and re-model everything. This

is when workshop procedures are reviewed, as well as the writing process and writing mechanics

among other things. In guided writing, the children are writing and you are walking around

responding to that writing. They could also be coming to you for writing conferences. Then

students have independent writing time, which we'll talk about next, and at the end of the writing

period, we have share time.

We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Don't forget this critical component of an effective literacy program!


Independent Writing

It is necessary that students write on a daily basis. They need the time to explore writing and

concepts of print. If their writing time is sporadic, you will not see the necessary growth in their

writing. During independent writing, students are writing without input from the teacher. They are

however able to get help from their peers.

We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Don't forget this critical component of an effective literacy program!



I think that writing is more difficult to teach than reading. There are a few things that I have

learned and I think that it makes all of the difference. Begin teaching writing as early as you can,

and as often as you can, preferably every day. It's as simple as that. The more your students

participate in writing, the better off they'll be. It makes a world of difference in their development

of print awareness.



We know that students can develop print awareness through writing! Shared writing, guided writing and interactive writing all play an important part of an effective literacy program!

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Concepts of Print

Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This set of free lesson plans will help you to know exactly where to begin!

Print awareness is an important component of a child's journey on the literacy train. We know that

the stronger their print awareness skills are, the higher their chance of success in reading. When 

students enter our classroom, we must be intentional in developing this print awareness. We can

definitely do this through reading, but what about those first days of school, when you are unsure

as to where you need to begin?


Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!


Before we ever pick up a book for comprehension purposes, we focus on print awareness. I like

 to begin the school year with 10 days of lessons that specifically focus on print awareness. The

first five days focus on concepts of books and the last five days focus on concepts of print. I also

like to take this time to talk about how a story made us feel. This can help to shape students' 

attitudes towards reading and writing in a positive way.


Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!

During this time we look at tons of posters, and we make some into anchor charts! It's a fun

way to introduce these to your students, because it is something that they will refer back to time

and time again. 

Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!

The awesome thing about this set of activities is that they do not require a certain book! These

lessons are applicable to any book that you choose to begin your school year. It is the perfect

way to introduce books to children, especially if they have not had exposure to them before.

Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!

It's amazing how much they learn in ten days and it makes learning enjoyable, which will

create positive literacy experiences for your students.

Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!

Print awareness is a crucial part of a child's growth in literacy and it's important that we




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Teaching concepts of print the first few days of school is a great way to kick-off your daily literacy block! This free resource will help you to know exactly where to begin!


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Developing Print Awareness Through Reading

Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

There are many predictors of reading success for the littlest of learners. Print awareness is definitely

on that list. What students are taught is important, but perhaps even more crucial is how they are

taught. As educators, it is our job to ensure that they learn most effectively. To develop print

awareness, a program should contain a combination of teacher read-alouds, shared reading, guided

reading as well as some language activities.

Teacher Read-Alouds

Read-alouds are not only great for enjoyment, but they provide a ton of additional experiences for

our students. They are helpful for modeling concepts of print and vocabulary introduction. During 

this time students also begin to develop their story sense. For students to get the most out 

of a read-aloud, it is important that scaffolding is provided. Scaffolding is the support that we give 

to our students as they are being read to. It involves all of the good routines that we go through as 

we conduct a read-aloud: activating prior knowledge, making predictions and monitoring 

comprehension throughout the story, and having conversations and sharing thoughts after reading.

Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

Shared Reading

Shared reading goes a little bit deeper than a general read-aloud. Not only do students learn more

about print awareness, but you're also able to have a book talk of sorts with them. These mini-

lessons normally consist of three parts, before reading, during reading and after reading.

The book can be introduced, and the teacher can set a purpose for reading. It is important in the

initial stages to focus on one specific area per lesson, such as concepts about books, types of text

(fiction, non-fiction), concepts about print and how stories are made (setting, plot), etc. Shared

reading is usually conducted using a Big Book or some sort of chart that contains a story, poem or

song, etc.

Language Activities

Language activities can be found throughout the day. These activities are all collaborative and

independent activities such as word-work activities, songs, games, and poems that would support

and aid in letter and sound recognition, concepts of print and vocabulary development.

Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

This would be all of the activities that you create for morning tubs, early finisher activities

as well as all of the center activities. It is important to be thoughtful about what you are planning

for students to do, because it can aid or hinder their progress.


Independent Reading

It is essential that students be given time to dive into print materials independently, or with a

partner. This can be different books, charts, poems, or familiar text to be revisited. Over the years

it has looked different, has had many different names, but the objective remains the same.

Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

Whether your school uses Just-Right books, fluency folders, book buddies, SSR (self-sustained 

reading), or drop everything and read (DEAR), children need time to read without teacher input. 

It is during this time that they are able to practice everything they've learned during instruction.


There are many components of an effective literacy program, and this post covers just a few. It is

imperative that we continue to build print awareness through reading. It is necessary that we know

our students and how to configure the environment of the classroom and the accompanying

activities. If one were to take a bird's eye view of a classroom, there would be many moving

parts. It can take a while to get all of the pieces moving together but remember consistency

is vital!


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Print awareness can be developed daily through reading activities in the classroom.

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Publishing Student Writing in the Primary Classroom

Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!

This post is sponsored by Studentreasures.

Your class has FINALLY reached the end of your writing unit, and now it's time for final drafts to be

completed and published! It's so important for young writers to be able to share their work with

someone other than their teacher or their peers. Publishing the writing of your students is the

perfect place to start!

Why Publish Student Writing?

There's nothing more inspiring for a young writer than to see their writing at its best. When students

begin writing, they are usually unable to read what they wrote yesterday. As they learn and grow in

their writing ability, they're so eager to go through the writing process and be able to get to that final

draft so that they can finally publish their work! It is important that we share and celebrate their

journey as a writer!

How Do I Publish Student Writing?

A fun way to publish their writing is through Studentreasures! A few years ago my class

published a book and they were so excited! Studentreasures made the process as easy as possible!

When your students find that they will be creating a classbook, their excitement for writer's

workshop will go through the roof!

Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!


Today I'm partnering with Studentreasures to help every child become a published author! They

provide free hands-on writing kits with a layout of your choice. As your students write their final

drafts, they are turned into a beautifully bound, hardcover book. Once their book is published,

having a publishing party and inviting parents is a special way to celebrate their writing!

What's the Catch?

So I know what you're thinking......what's the catch, how much does this cost? There is no catch at

all! For all of your hard work, your class will receive a book free of charge, all you have to do is

open up the ordering to parents. If they choose to purchase a book for themselves, they will

pre-order the book. This will be an awesome addition to your classroom library! If for any reason

they are not satisfied when they receive the book, Studentreasures has a 100% satisfaction

guaranteed policy! How awesome is that?

Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!


How Do I Sign Up?

Signing up is easy and painless, I promise! All you have to do is click here, and you can sign up 

to get your free publishing kit and writing activities to inspire your students!  Studentreasures

provides support along the way, so please know that you will not be alone as you walk with your

students through this process. You will also have access to their online Teacher Community!

Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!


Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Let

Studentreasures be a part of your publishing process today!


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Publishing the work of your little authors does not have to be hard or complicated. Get started today!

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Predictors of Reading Success

Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.

Research has shown time and time again that students must have exposure to repeated positive

literacy experiences in order to be successful. There are many things that factor into the reading

success of little ones, such as print awareness. They all come to school with their unique 

backgrounds and it is up to us to fill in their deficits. So let's dive into some early predictors of 

reading success. 

Knowledge of Letter Names

Letter Recognition is one of the biggest goals of kindergarten. It is also one of the predictors

of reading success in a student's first year of school. When students enter school and they do 

not have a frame of reference when it comes to letters, some of them can have a steep learning

curve ahead. In this case, accuracy is not always king. A student can be accurate in naming the

letters, but it is the ease with which they name the letters that we should be looking at. 

Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.

When a student can name the letters of the alphabet with fluency, then they will have an easier

time learning all about the sounds that letters make because they already have a frame of

reference. If a student spends most of their time figuring out what each letter is, they will have

less time and effort available to use other strategies to decode print.

Phonological Awareness

We know that most children begin to develop their sense of phonological awareness as  

preschoolers, but what is it exactly? It is the ability to think about the sounds in a word, an

understanding that words are made up of syllables, sounds, and rhymes. They begin to recognize

that words are their own thing (asking what the word bright means), that words can sound the

same (pet and wet), and they also become aware of individual sounds and can manipulate them.

Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.


When a student is well-developed in phonological awareness, then they already have a head

start in knowing how sounds and letters work together in print. When they have this ability, then 

they are able to begin using sound-letter knowledge effectively in reading and writing. One of the

strongest predictors of reading success in first grade and beyond is a student's level of 

phonological awareness at the end of kindergarten. If you have students who are struggling in 

this area, then early intervention is key.

Oral Language

Oral language is the foundation of learning literacy and a predictor of reading success. School

provides a language-rich environment, one that is different from the language used at home. It

will range anywhere from informal (used at home) to the more formal communication (used at

school). The development of this oral language is an important part of any successful

kindergarten program. So what is oral language? Initially, you would think that it is just the

spoken word, but it is also listening and thinking, which is all combined together to give you

oral language. The more a student explores language in the classroom, they begin to better

understand how to use language for reading and writing.

Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.

Another purpose of oral language in the classroom is to learn new information. By the time

they have arrived at school, they have already learned to talk. Once they enter our classrooms,

they have to talk to learn, in order to be successful. They begin to use what they already know

about language to help them make sense of what is written on a page. At this point, they start

to make a connection between oral and written language, which is crucial for emergent readers.


If you find that you have some students who are struggling with learning to read, take a quick

minute to see if they could have a deficit in one of these areas. If they do, then research has shown

that these students need explicit instruction in these areas through early intervention. Don't delay!


Early literacy is the key for students to be successful in reading. Letter recognition, phonological awareness and oral language are the best predictors of reading success.

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Black History Read Alouds for the Primary Classroom






Hey guys and dolls, how's it going? February came quickly, and out of nowhere! I feel like we 

barely got back to school, and poof! There went January! February is one of my favorite months, 

not only because of Valentine's Day but also because of Black History Month! It also means that 

spring is on the way! I love to introduce topics by utilizing read alouds, and I want to discuss 

some of them with you today!


I like to begin with books that talk about how even though our skin and hair might be different 

from others, we're still the same! Before we read books that focus on people like Harriet Tubman, 

Coretta Scott King, etc., I like to read books that features the perspective of children. 

I've found that they relate to it more easily! I do not wait until the calendar changes to February.

I start reading these books at the beginning of the school year! When February comes we just



This post contains Amazon affiliate links, which means that they throw a 

few coins my way to keep this blog running, at no extra cost to you!


The Crayon Box that Talked is a great book that begins with a box of crayons who do not like 

each other. By the end of the story, they realize that their diversity is what makes that so great!

From there, we move on to our next book, which just happens to be one of my faves!





We extend our learning from the crayon box book, and we read The Skin You Live In.

This book talks about how all shades of skin are wonderful, from cinnamon spice skin, all 

the way to lemon tart bold skin. I love how it then keeps going, about it's not dumb skin,

or smart skin or I'm lesser than you skin. It's so important that our kiddos hear this message!




The Colors of Us follows Lena as decides to paint herself and people in her neighborhood. 

She thinks that all she has to do is to pick the color brown because brown is brown. As they 

take a walk, Lena's mother shows her that there are many different shades of the color,

and that they are all perfect!




I Love My Hair is all about self-acceptance. I think that I love this book because it reminds me

of myself as a child! I HATED to have my hair done. I kind of tolerated my mom doing my hair,

but my grandmother was RUTHLESS!!! She didn't care if it hurt, she just got it done!

Though it does bring back fond memories!





After we talk about how we all look different on the outside, and the shades of our skin are 

wonderful, we start to get more into The Underground Railroad. I love to introduce this 

movement by reading Henry's Freedom Box. They can't believe people used to own other people,

like a piece of clothing or toy. They're also very interested in the fact that Henry mails himself to 

freedom! This book begins with Henry as a child, and then follows him through adulthood.



Goin' Someplace Special tells the story of 'Tricia Ann, a little girl growing up in the South 

during the 1950s, a time when segregation was legal and enforced. She begs her grandmother 

to go on a trip to Someplace Special, all by herself. With some reluctance, her grandmother 

agrees. While traveling, 'Tricia Ann is always reminded of where she can't go, where she can't sit, 

and more. Then she remembers what her grandmother told her, to always walk with her head 

held high, because she is somebody! And then she finally arrives at Someplace Special,

the library! I love this story because the library was always my favorite place to go as a child, 

and it still is.



I'm not even sure when I ran across this book, but once I read it, I knew that A Taste of Colored 

Water had to have a place in my classroom library. This book is slightly different, as it is from the 

perspective of white children. It's all Abbey Finch's fault! Lulu and Jelly just have to visit town, 

because they want to see the colored fountain! They're imagining all the flavors, cherry, lemon,

orange, apple-you name it! Once they arrive in town, they happen upon a protest, marching singers,

police and their dogs, as well as firemen and their hoses. Their world is turned upside down when

they 


You can find all of these books and more by clicking on each of the pictures, which will take you 

to Amazon. Alright, so those are some of my favorite read-clouds begin learning about black history.

For even more books please visit my Amazon page and click on black history and diversity. If you're

looking for a black history resource, you can find that here.


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Read alouds are a great way to encourage discussions on black history and diversity throughout the year!



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